Risk Management In Film

In the film industry, Risk Management Plans covering Occupational Health and Safety do exist and must be put in place for every film made in order to conform to legislative requirements. However, because I was unable to obtain any Risk Management Plans for a film which covered other types of risk, it is impossible to know whether Film Studios actually use them other than for Occupational Health and Safety.

When we think of Risk Management in any business, even though very important, we are not just referring to Occupational Health and Safety, we are also considering any other kind of risk associated which has implications on the business itself. The list of risks can be many depending on the context and setting of which the film occurs.

In the film-making process, the setting or environment in which the film occurs can drastically change, causing various risks to befall a production, some risks which may be familiar and others which may have never been dealt with before. In film, this means there are many, many risks which can occur on a production.

When one thinks about how many films are made each year, it would mean film-makers constantly deal with a high turnover of risks, risk which are complex and can vary, depending on the film itself. This actually means that film-makers themselves are Risk Management Experts in their own right because they are not just constantly dealing with risks, they are dealing with risks which constantly change.

Indeed, the utilization of ‘risk benefit’, especially when it comes to stunts and action sequences is extremely heightened, all in the name of the thrill seeking audiences and the money to be made from them.

If Film is one of the highest risk industries, the fact that they travel the globe and visit many communities, shouldn’t they then be obligated, to let communities know, in detail, what’s going on in their own back yard so to speak?

Often in our community or local area, when an apartment complex is going to be built or construction takes place, more likely than not, those in the neighborhood would receive information from the council detailing the exact building plans where the community is consulted. On the contrary, when a film is made in a certain area, town or country, more often than not, film production companies do not provide the exact details of the dangerous activities that may be involved, to the people in the community, often these activities posing much more of a threat than the construction of a building.

The film industry will not communicate and consult with the community in exact detail, because this would simply run a risk of letting their competitors know their plans. Even though fire and explosions are controlled to a certain extent, these dangerous elements are still present and there is always a risk when dealing with these elements no matter how controlled.

This is an example of a reason not to communicate or consult but sometimes at the expense of ethical and moral values, where members of the community are oblivious to exact details, when they should be in fact more informed.

In fact there are many kinds or risk in film and it’s ‘sister’ industry television which breach ethical and moral standards, for example, one only had to look at the numerous times journalists and camera crew, risk their lives in a worn torn or volatile country to secure a story for a major news station.

In film, every time a stunt person performs a stunt, no matter how controlled the stunt, the risk is still high, if a stunt person dies, the film will still go ahead because the stunt person is considered expendable – here we see an extreme case of Risk Benefit utilizing death in exchange for the immortality of the Stars presence and the success of the film. The only other industry I can relate to similarly, which incorporates a similar view is the military or Special Forces.

Considering how risk plays such a big part in film, it’s quite surprising that the subject of Film and Risk at present is a very much neglected by most academics and scholars today which is why I decided to take up this subject as part of my study in Risk and Project management. In regards to the film industry and these topics I came across a knowledge gap. Here are some of the issues I encountered while studying the subject:

- I could not locate or find any sufficient examples of the Project Management Model being applied to the film-making process, even though it’s quite easy to apply when considering the processes the film industry uses.

- On the internet there are many ‘Risk Management Plans’ for a variety of different industries however, for the Film Industry, there was not one example.

- ‘The Australian Film and Television Industry Safety Guidelines’ (144 page document) has been in ‘Draft’ format for 10 years. There are so many Safety Considerations to consider not all of them can be accounted for.

- My local Paddington, Sydney Library had no books or published material on the topics of Risk or Project Management in Film. Both of these areas extremely applicable and valid to the film-making process, one marvels why the lack of information.

- The Australian Film Television and Radio School Library at Fox Studios, despite the enormous collection of books on film-making, again there were no books on either of these topics of ‘Risk Management’ and ‘Project Management’. Both librarians I consulted were baffled and surprised at finding the knowledge gap when I had asked for information on the topic. They believed they had everything there is to find on film-making in their library, however they did not have what I was looking for, perhaps one of the most important things there is to read about in film.

- On top of that, not many professionals in the industry are willing to talk about their work and government bodies like Screen Australia, are not interested in providing examples of ‘Risk Management Plans’ used on previous films because of ‘privacy’ reasons. I consider this excuse quite poor, since many Project Management and Risk Management students, on most cases, easily ask their industry type for a copy in which it will gladly be provided – in the film industry it is quite closed and unhelpful, well at least in Australia that seems to be the case.

There was one rare instant, while I was studying this topic, in which a lady whose name and ex-employer I won’t mention, was resigning from her job and she forwarded me a small example of a ‘Risk Register’ for a film production. I am very grateful for this information. After viewing the Risk Register I realized, as suspected, that it indeed was very much the same kind of ‘Risk Register’ you would use in ANY business type. Sometimes I find all the secrecy in film unnecessarily!

During my research I created a blue, yellow and grey model based on my own understanding of how the Risk Management Process, the Project Management Process is entwined within the Film-making Process.

Even though the environment/setting of every film changes, there are still certain key aspects of Risk to consider, which are relevant for every film.

Even though Risk and Project Management aren’t widely taught at film school, it should be because it actually adds, in a significant way, to a student’s mind, a much better and wholesome understanding and awareness of risks in their industry type, this also adding to a better management and handling of risks overall. Most learning facilities teach their students a widely understood awareness of risk principles applied to their industry type, the film industry should also do the same for the students and filmmakers.

Most people would agree that the film industry is shrouded in secrecy, mystery, exclusivity giving us the impression that the way they run is very different and unique. Through my research I would like to point out that exclusivity and uniqueness is not the case, and that the film industry is just like any other business in the way that it runs and the processes that it uses, only that, when it comes to risk, they may be the biggest risk takers of them all.

I came across Risk Management in Film and Project Management in Film (one of the most highly neglected topics in the world) by mistake, when I decided to apply my business course to the film industry, I realized there were hardly any books or resources published on the topic. I decided to write my own book about it.

Strengthening the CFO’s Role in Strategic Risk Management

Strengthening the CFO’s role in strategic risk management to lead Capital intensive business in market volatility

Capital Intensive Businesses

Capital-intensive business exists with lower margins. Management is always expecting Return on Capital Employed (ROCE) above the cost of capital. The major businesses are Oil & Gas, Infrastructure, Construction, IT etc.

Market Volatility Challenges

Market volatility, ceaseless pressure on margins and demanding stakeholders increase the difficulties of thriving in an increasingly interconnected, interdependent and unpredictable global economy.

Many organizations have yet to adapt to this new state of the economic landscape. Doing nothing is no longer an option – they need to adjust and take action now.

Many organizations are now transforming their businesses to strengthen their organization to save costs, create more client-centricity, restore stakeholder confidence and/or embed new business models.

For many organizations, long-term success depends on the success of these transformation programs. To make it more challenging, the margin for error continues to be small, and the environment in which transformation needs to happen continues to increase in complexity.

Strategic Risk Management

• It’s a process for identifying, assessing, and managing both internal and external events and risks that could impede the achievement of strategy and strategic objectives.

• The ultimate goal is creating and protecting shareholder and stakeholder value.

• It’s a primary component and necessary foundation of the organization’s overall enterprise risk management process.

• It is a component of Enterprises Risk Management (ERM), it is by definition effected by boards of directors, management, and others.

• It requires a strategic view of risk and consideration of how external and internal events or scenarios will affect the ability of the organization to achieve its objectives.

• It’s a continual process that should be embedded in strategy setting, strategy execution, and strategy management.

Identifying concrete steps for CFOs to increase involvement in risk management for investment decisions

Concrete Steps to Increase the CFO’s Involvement in Risk Management

• Build a tight link between risk management and other Business Process

• Lead a corporate-level discussion of Risk Preference, Focusing on Risk Choice and select optimal mix

• Use Risk Analytics to communicate investment and strategic Decisions

Build a tight link between risk management and other Business Process

• Focus on foresee issues which will emerging in the future instead of current issues.

• On the basis of prioritization a guidelines to be issued for which Business performance metrics would be effected.

• Business Planners conduct adhoc analysis of upside versus risk, focusing most, if not all, of other attention on a single “Center Cut” scenario.

• Highlighting exactly where and how risk will affect the Business Plan

• Incorporating systematic stress testing using macro scenarios which will reflects possible impact on financial planning

• Applying probabilistic “financial at risk” modeling for major investment decision these efforts. (Cash in hand vs cash needs)

Lead a corporate-level discussion of Risk Preference, Focusing on Risk Choice and select optimal mix

• It is critical to have clear answers to the following questions before making decisions:

o What is the company’s competence in the market?

o Are the decision makers familiar with the risks involved including the tail risks and understand their potential impact?

o Is the company capable of surviving extreme events?

• Risk appetite articulates the level of risk a company is prepared to accept to achieve its strategic objectives.

• Risk appetite frameworks help management understand a company’s risk profile, find an optimal balance between risk and return, and nurture a healthy risk culture in the organization. It explains the risk tolerance of the company both qualitatively and quantitatively.

• Qualitative measures specify major business strategies and business goals that set up the direction of the business and outline favourable risks.

• Quantitative measures provide concrete levels of risk tolerance and risk limits, critical in implementing effective risk management.

Use Risk Analytics to communicate investment and strategic Decisions

• CFO plays an important role in financial and strategic aspects of investments and the evaluation of major decision. He leads the discussion and rival proposals and solutions and often hold powerful decision rights.

• Major Projects with value at stake comparable to total risk from current company operations are discussed and decided with qualitative list of major risks.

• The CFO is ensuring by defining right set of core financial and risk analytics to run for each option to ensure this value stake is brought to light and debated.

EXAMINING LEADING PRACTICES APPLICABLE TO CFOS THAT CAN AUGMENT A COMPANY’S FINANCIAL HEALTH

Best Practices applicable for Company’s Financial Health

CFO have several options to compete more effectively in the Risk Management decisions. Improving returns starts with rethinking where to play-and with four strategic steps that many companies often overlook when it comes to improving performance.

Where to play: A more profit-focused portfolio

• The most pressing issue for leadership teams in capital intensive industries is whether to stay in businesses in which margins have been relentlessly driven down. Many companies are choosing to exit low-profit businesses that once were considered to be core. As they rebalance their portfolios, they are migrating up the value-added chain, investing in related sectors where new technologies can provide competitive advantages.

• Profit pool mapping is an important tool for assessing whether and where it makes sense to do business. In heavy industries, management teams often are so focused on volumes and tonnage that they overlook where the biggest profit pools are. By understanding the sources and distribution of profits across their industry, companies can gain an inside edge on improving returns.

• The premium end of the business typically represents a very large proportion of the profit pool. The best opportunities often cluster there for companies competing in capital-intensive industries.

• Picking the right place to play in the value chain is also critical to improving returns-and the most profitable spot varies across industries.

Best Practices applicable for Company’s Financial Health How to win: Four strategic steps to improving returns

1. Improve the cost base and review capex continually -

• In capital-intensive industries where low returns have become endemic, reducing costs and improving capex efficiency are important ways to improve performance – New developing market entrants in capital-intensive industries have built a strong competitive advantage by keeping capex relatively low. By contrast, the focus on cutting costs at many established players means they sometimes lose sight of improving capex. One way to get the balance right: Develop a more disciplined approach to managing capex, and benchmark the company’s performance against the industry’s leaders.

• Cost discipline makes a critical difference. One-time efforts usually fail to deliver savings that stick, as our research shows. One explanation is that in tough times, management teams are quick to cut costs, but when the cycle swings up, they tend to take their eye off cost improvement and focus on growth-related priorities.

• Developing a rigorous approach to cost improvement and nurturing the right capabilities to optimize working capital can help capital-intensive companies outperform.

2. Build the lowest-cost position

• Geography is another key factor for improving returns. Investing in geographies that offer the lowest landed cost position can create a strong competitive advantage. It’s particularly important in asset-heavy industries where the one-time cost of closing and moving businesses is high.

• The best-performing firms revisit their geographic footprint regularly, as cost dynamics are constantly evolving.

• Companies that can choose the lowest-cost geography up front gain a competitive edge. Those in mature industries need to weigh the short-term downside against the longer-term benefits of reducing complexity.

3. Use mergers and acquisitions strategically

• Smart acquisitions can help improve performance significantly, but many companies get off to a bad start by investing at the top of the cycle, when prices are at their peak, simply because that’s when cash is available. Leadership teams that take a strategic, disciplined and long-term approach to M&A instead of a tactical and episodic approach can improve returns significantly.

• Companies that nurture M&A as a core competence derive the greatest value from them. Their leadership teams devote time to developing a structured roadmap of the most attractive potential targets, making it easier to acquire assets when the right opportunity comes along-and to target acquisitions at the bottom of the cycle.

• Companies that are most experienced in M&A build their capabilities over time. They search hard for merger or acquisition candidates that will add to their operating profit and fuel balanced growth. They pursue nearly as many scope deals as scale deals, moving into adjacent markets as well as expanding their share of existing markets. Most importantly, they create Repeatable Models for identifying, evaluating and then closing good deals. What they typically find is that there are plenty of good prospects to be pursued and that the risk involved decreases with experience.

4. Service ace

• For traditional capital-intensive industries, service can be a highly profitable business in its own right, generating better and faster return on investment than new production facilities, large-scale R&D programs or acquisitions.

• Indeed, for many industrial manufacturers, investing in service is the only way to sustainably grow profits in a tough economic environment. Investing in a service business also lowers capital intensity.

• Investing in a world-class service business can become a strategic ace, elevating a company above competitors in an environment where differentiation on products and cost is difficult to achieve. The range of service opportunities, some larger than others, will vary by industry and company. Here again, mapping profit pools can help identify the potential size of service businesses and those with the greatest returns.

o There is no question that companies in capital-intensive industries operate in a difficult environment today. But leadership teams that commit to a bold ambition have opportunities to break away from the pack and achieve double-digit returns significantly above the cost of capital.

Best Practices applicable for Company’s Financial Health-Getting there requires a strategic shift toward a more profit-focused portfolio:

• Find the most attractive profit pools in your businesses.

• Adopt a mindset of continual cost improvement and capex optimization.

• Look for opportunities to drive down the company’s landed cost footprint by investing in the right geographies.

• Develop strong in-house M&A expertise and a structured roadmap of potential deals.

• Invest in related service businesses

Leadership teams that take these steps will not only give returns a powerful boost, they also will help to rebuild competitive advantage and position their companies to win in a changed industrial landscape.

Reengineering Strategies to improve the link Between Risk Management and Business Planning Process

• Business process reengineering is one approach for redesigning the way work is done to better support the organization’s mission and reduce costs.

• Reengineering starts with a high-level assessment of the organization’s mission, strategic goals, and customer needs.

• Within the framework of this basic assessment of mission and goals, reengineering focuses on the organization’s business processes–the steps and procedures that govern how resources are used to create products and services that meet the needs of particular customers or markets.

• Reengineering identifies, analyses, and redesigns an organization’s core business processes with the aim of achieving dramatic improvements in critical performance measures, such as cost, quality, service, and speed.

• Reengineering recognizes that an organization’s business processes are usually fragmented into sub processes and tasks that are carried out by several specialized functional areas within the organization.

• The CFO Act focuses on the need to significantly improve the government’s financial management and reporting practices. Having appropriate financial systems with accurate data is critical to measuring performance and reducing the costs of operations

Management & Decision Support Structure

• Investigate suggestion for reducing costs and to make them practical and acceptable

• Obtain definite prices and costs

• Present recommendation in comprehensive report

People & Organization

• Organize around outcomes and not tasks

• Have those who use the output of the process perform the process

• Built control in process systems

• Treat geographically dispersed resources

Policies & Regulations

• Develop policies and procedures

• Comply with compliances

• Environmental compatibility

Information & Technology

• Information should go along with the process

• Link all activities

• Capture information at source

• Create reports and real time online updates

Frame for Assessing Reengineering

• Assessing the Organisation’s Decision to Pursue Reengineering

• Reassessing of Its Mission and Strategic Goals

• Identifying Performance Problems and Set Improvement Goals

• Engagement in Reengineering

• Assessing the New Process’ Development

• Appropriately Managing of Reengineering Project

• Analysis of the Target Process and Developed with Feasible Alternatives

• Completion of Sound Business Case for Implementing the New Process

• Assessing Project Implementation and Results

• Following a Comprehensive Implementation Plan

• Executives Addressing Change Management Issues

• New Process Achieving the Desired Results

FOCUSING ON RISK PREFERENCE AND CHOICES FOR CFOs CONSIDERATION TO DELIVER ECONOMIC PROFIT DURING TOUGH CONDITIONS

CFOs need to develop a stronger focus on the economic and performance drivers of their business and need to understand how the effective allocation of scarce resource will help them achieve financial objectives. The CFO must build a performance management capability that can:

• Provide visibility and analysis of information to support resource allocation

• Support the decision-making process by providing the right information to the right people at the right time

• Demonstrate the financial impacts of different decisions and scenarios to enable the organization to predict and compare outcomes

• Incentivize executives and managers to make decisions that maximize marginal contribution

• Enable a data-driven view on resource allocations across the entire value chain (to include corporate strategy; sales, marketing and customer service; supply chain manufacturing and production; finance, HR, legal and compliance)

• Identify the most critical decision points that drive economic performance

With a unique perspective across the entire business, CFOs can provide valuable insight into the decisions that create or protect marginal contribution across the value chain. Armed with a detailed understanding of how and where growth in sales leads to growth in profits, they can offer an objective assessment of fixed and variable costs, and then identify how a reduction in costs can maintain revenues while improving profit contribution.

• Establish a clear, forward-looking line of sight on relevant data for critical decision points

Finance must have access to a robust data set, built around the decisions that drive most economic value in the organization, including assessment of opportunity cost. This demands accurate, verifiable underlying data and an understanding of how the data relates to value chain decisions. This will enable the CFO to conduct scenario planning around these different decision points.

• Develop aligned performance management processes that drive rational decisions

Finance must be able to translate insights and understanding into the desired end product – rational decisions that maximize the desired economic return. Aligning traditional resource allocation processes with business objectives helps ensure repeatability and the sustainability of the organization.

Risk Management in Accounting Firms: Overview of The New Australian Standards

INTRODUCTION

At its most basic level, risk is defined as the probability of not achieving, or reaching, certain outcomes (goals). Risk is measured in terms of the effect that an event will have on the degree of uncertainty of reaching stated objectives. Risk is commonly thought of in this context as a negative connotation: the risk of an adverse event occurring.

This article discusses the risks faced by accounting firms in Australia, and gives an overview of the new risk management standard (APES 325) issued by the professional standards board.

WHAT IS RISK IN ACCOUNTING FIRMS?

In the context of the professional Accounting Firm, risk is not a new concept for practitioners: it has been attached to the profession for as long as accountants have offered services in a commercial setting. However, as the number and size of legal claims against professional public accountants has increased over the years, so too has the issue of risk and risk management also increased in importance.

Risk management is the system by which the firm seeks to manage its over-arching (and sometimes, conflicting) public-interest obligations combined with managing its business objectives. An effective risk management system will facilitate business continuity, enabling quality and ethical services to be supplied and delivered to clients, in conjunction with ensuring that the reputation and credibility of the firm is protected.

WHY IS A STANDARD REQUIRED?

The Accounting Professional & Ethical Standards Board (APESB) recognised that public interest and business risks had not been adequately covered in existing APES standards, notably APES 320 (Quality Control for Firms). In releasing the standard, the APESB replaces and extends the focus of a range of risk management documents issued by the various accounting bodies. Accordingly, APES 325 (Risk Management for Firms) was released, with mandatory status from 1 January, 2013.

The intention of APES 325 is not to impose onerous obligations on accounting firms who are already complying with existing requirements addressing engagement risks. All professional firms are currently required to document and implement quality control policies and procedures in accordance with APES 320/ASQC 1. Effective quality control systems, tailored to the activities of the firm, will already be designed to deal with most risk issues that arise in professional public accounting firm. However, APES 325 does expect firms to consider the broader risks that impact the business generally, particularly its continuity.

THE NEW REQUIREMENTS

The process of risk management in the Professional Accounting Firm requires a consideration of the risks around governance, business continuity, human resources, technology, and business, financial and regulatory environments. While this is a useful list of risks to consider, it will be risks that are relevant to the operations of the practice that should be given closest attention.

Objectives

The ultimate objective for compliance with the Risk Management standard is the creation of an effective Risk Management Framework which allows a firm to meet its overarching public interest obligations as well as its business goals. This framework will consist of policies directed towards risk management, and the procedures necessary to implement and monitor compliance with those policies. It is expected that the bulk of the Firm’s quality control policies and procedures, (developed in accordance with APES 320) will be embedded within the Risk Management Framework, thus facilitating integration of the requirements of this standard and that of APES 320, and ensuring consistency across all the Firm’s policies and procedures.

A critical component of the Risk Management Framework is the consideration and integration of the Firm’s overall strategic and operational policies and practices, which also needs to take account of the Firm’s Risk appetite in undertaking potentially risky activities.

Whilst the standard allows for the vast majority of situations that are likely to be encountered by the accounting firm, the owners should also consider if there are particular activities or circumstances that require the Firm to establish policies and procedures in addition to those required by the Standard to meet the stated aims.

Establishing & Maintaining

Ultimately, it is the partners (or owners) of the Accounting Firm that will bear the ultimate responsibility for the Firm’s Risk Management Framework. So it is this group (or person if solely owned) that must take the lead in establishing and maintaining a Risk Management Framework, as with periodic evaluation of its design and effectiveness.

Often times, the establishment and maintenance of the Risk Management Framework is delegated to a single person (sometimes not an owner), so the Firm must ensure that any Personnel assigned responsibility for establishing and maintaining its Risk Management Framework in accordance with this Standard have the necessary skills, experience, commitment and (especially), authority.

When designing the framework, the firm requires policies and procedures to be developed that identify, assess and manage the key organisational risks being faced. These risks generally fall into 8 areas:

Governance risks and management of the firm;
Business continuity risks (including succession planning, and disaster recovery (non-technology related);
Business operational risks;
Financial risks;
Regulatory change risks;
Technology risks (including disaster recovery);
Human resources; and
Stakeholder risks.

The nature and extent of the policies and procedures developed will depend on various factors such as the size and operating characteristics of the Firm and whether it is part of a Network. In addition, if there are any risks that happen to be specific to a particular firm – caused by its particular operating characteristics – these also need to be identified and catered for. At all times, a Firms public interest obligation must be considered.

A key factor in any risk management process is the leadership of the firm, as it is the example that is set and maintained by the Firms leadership that sets the tone for the rest of the firm. Consequently, adopting a risk-aware culture by a Firm is dependent on the clear, consistent and frequent actions and messages from and to all levels within the Firm. These messages and actions need to constantly emphasise the Firm’s Risk Management policies and procedures.

Monitoring

An essential component of the Risk Management process is monitoring the system, to enable the Firm overall to have reasonable confidence that the system works. The system works when risks are properly identified and either eliminated, managed, or mitigated. Most risks cannot be entirely eliminated, so the focus of the system needs to be on managing risks down (preventing occurrences as far as practicable), or mitigating the risk (handling the event should it occur).

As part of the system, a process needs to be installed that constantly ensures that the Framework is – and will continue to be – relevant, adequate and operating effectively, and that any instances of non-compliance with the Firm’s Risk Management policies and procedures are detected and dealt with. This includes bringing such instances to the attention of the Firm’s leadership who are required to take appropriate corrective action.

The Framework needs regular monitoring (at least annually), and by someone from within the Firm’s leadership (either a person or persons) with sufficient and appropriate experience, authority and responsibility for ensuring that such regular reviews of the Firm’s Risk Management Framework occurs when necessary.

Documentation

A Risk Management system needs to be properly and adequately documented, so that all the necessary requirements can be complied with, and referred to (if necessary). The form and content of the documentation is a matter of judgment, and depends on a number of factors, including: the number of people in the firm; the number of offices the Firm operates, and; the nature and complexity of the Firm’s practice and the services it provides.

Proper and adequate documentation enables the Risk Management policies and procedures to be effectively communicated to the Firm’s personnel. A key message that must be included in all such communications is that each individual in the firm has a personal responsibility for Risk Management and are required to comply with all such policies and procedures. In addition, and in recognition of the importance of obtaining feedback, personnel should be encouraged to communicate their views and concerns on Risk Management matters.

In documenting the risk framework, the Firm needs to include and cover following aspects:

The procedures to be followed for identifying potential Risks;
The Firm’s risk appetite;
The actual identification of risks;
Procedures for assessing and managing, and treating the identified risks;
Documentation processes;
Procedures for dealing with non-compliance with the framework;
Training of Staff in relation to Risk Management; and
Procedures for regular review of the Risk Management Framework.

In alignment with the monitoring of the Risk Management system, all instances of non-compliance with the Firm’s Risk Management policies and procedures detected though its Monitoring process need to be documented, as with the actions taken by the Firm’s leadership in respect of the non-compliance.

Finally, all relevant documentation pertinent to the Risk Management process needs to be retained by the Firm for sufficient time to permit those performing the monitoring process to evaluate compliance with the Risk Management Framework, and also to follow applicable legal or regulatory requirements for record retention.

SUMMARY

Risk is an ever-present and growing component of delivering professional accounting services to clients, and is not confined to taking on client work that can put the firm’s reputation into decline. It is the everyday business conditions and decisions made that can weigh heavily on a firm.

The modern accounting firm is in the unique position of having all the operating risks of a main-stream business, with the addition of those imposed by the various regulators and authorities.

A comprehensive and effective Risk Management Framework will assist owners of firm in identifying deficiencies and blind-spots that can impact a firm, as well as placing a commercial assessment on the probability of an occurrence, and putting in place clear plans on what to do and when.

With more than twenty years in the fields of accounting and finance, sales and marketing, and operational activity, Michael (MK) has an extensive understanding how businesses succeed in a holistic manner.

He is also the Director of Insignia Consulting, accounting and business management consultants. Insignia Consulting has particular expertise, and specialises in The Quality Control Manual for Accounting Firms in Australia, with experience with QA Audits and developing customised manuals for public practice firms.